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My Grandmother’s Attic

When’s the last time you went into your attic? I did not give my attic much thought until I started a new job. Now I am amazed to discover how rare people go in their attics. I have talked with homeowners who have not been in their attic for 20+ years.  One new homeowner said that she purchased a home 8 months ago and has actually never been in her attic.

Here’s my attic story:

When I was a little girl, I remember seeing magic stairs pop down from the ceiling in one of my grandmother’s bedrooms in her tiny rancher. Kids who see stairs always wonder what’s on the other end. I was so small and the stairs so large that I never went beyond just looking up.

As I got older and saw those stairs descend each Christmas to bring down decorations, I would beg my mother to allow me to go up. It was always a firm “no,” and I lived with it.

After my grandmother passed away, I was at the house with my mother and my aunt. We were packing up boxes and reminiscing. I walked into the spare bedroom, where I saw the stairs to the attic had been pulled down. I was 32, and I had my own attic with pull-down stairs by that time. But the lure remained. I HAD to see what was up there. My aunt heard me step up the first three rungs and yelled out, “Don’t go up there! It’s full of asbestos!” As I am apt to do, I said okay and went up anyway, but stealthily and quickly. It was gross. “Stuff” hung from the rafters, my eyes burned, I couldn’t breathe, and it felt like I was inhaling particles.

A dirty attic with poor insulation, similar to what was in my grandmother’s home.

But I did see my Fisher-Price castle with the working castle gate. I ran and snatched it like a thief in the night. The Lincoln Logs were covered in the debris that was hanging everywhere. On the floor, I saw what polite people would not refer to as “rodent turds,” but it most assuredly was. I ran to the kitchen with my castle and washed it off while my aunt looked at me unfavorably and told me that I should not be handling something covered with asbestos. Plus, I hadn’t listened to her and went up in the first place. She was right, of course.

It ended up that my aunt had specialists come out in hazmat suits and respirators to remove the toxic material in my grandmother’s attic and had it replaced with safe insulation. The lesson that I learned is that if you don’t know what’s in your attic, it can hurt you. I also learned that if you are pigheaded enough to ignore the pleas of your aunt and mother to stay out of an attic, you can score a childhood toy, but at what cost?

I’ll end this by saying: Know what’s in your attic. If you don’t know or don’t want to know, hire a professional to do this for you. Attics and More will provide a free complimentary home energy analysis, which includes inspection of your attic and crawlspace.

As for my Fisher-Price castle? It’s now safely inside my attic. I feel content, and some redemption, knowing it’s there.

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Attic Insulation: What You Need, What to Avoid

With climate patterns growing more chaotic each winter – from record lows in 2019 to record highs this year – evaluating your attic’s insulation needs has never been more important. As unpredictable seasons become “the new normal,” it’s important to prepare your home for a bumpy weather ride. 

According to EnergyStar: “The attic is usually where you can find some of the largest opportunities to save energy in your home.” Additionally, a review of your attic insulation status may also reveal the presence of dangerous materials – especially in older homes. Let’s examine the ABC’s of dangerous insulation and also determine (if our insulation is safe) how much your attic may need. 

Know the Dangers

Older homes may contain a variety of insulation materials that have been determined to be hazardous to your health. If your home has been sold in the past several years, chances are good such materials would have been discovered during an inspection. Some of the key culprits include:

Asbestos

Banned in American homes since the 1980s, asbestos can still be found in older homes. Exposure to asbestos has been linked to increased risk of mesothelioma, asbestosis, and lung cancer.

Appearance: Asbestos insulation has a flat, loose appearance and is usually gray.

What to do: Do not attempt to remove asbestos yourself! Immediately contact a professional removal firm. 

An attic in West Chester, PA with asbestos filling. 

Vermiculite

In its natural state, vermiculite is a gray/brown/silver mineral. When exposed to extreme heat, it puffs like popcorn, expanding to create an effective insulator.

On its own, vermiculite isn’t dangerous. However, vermiculite produced in the U.S. before 1990 probably came from one mine which, was later found to contain a significant asbestos deposit. If your home was built before then, it might contain vermiculite (which is often marketed under the Zonolite brand). As such, asbestos-laced vermiculite could pose the same health risks as asbestos insulation. 

Appearance: Pebble-like granules of a grayish-brown or silvery-gold color.

What to do: The EPA recommends these guidelines:  

  • “Leave vermiculite insulation undisturbed in your attic or in your walls.
  • Do not store boxes or other items in your attic if it contains vermiculite insulation.
  • Do not allow children to play in an attic with vermiculite insulation.
  • Do not attempt to remove the insulation yourself.
  • Hire a professional asbestos contractor if you plan to remodel or conduct renovations that would disturb the vermiculite in your attic or walls to make sure the material is safely handled and/or removed.”

Urea Formaldehyde Foam Insulation (UFFI)

As if the name didn’t sound unappealing enough, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) has been found to emit toxic formaldehyde vapors, which can cause numerous nasty health effects – especially respiratory. UFFI can mostly be found in homes older than 35-40 years. 

Appearance: Yellowish, dull foam, or loose particles. Inspectapedia notes: “Look for small amounts of soft crumbly foam insulation at tiny openings in wall cavities such as at knot-holes or gaps between siding boards … in the attic you may find the same oozing insulation shown at the top of gable end walls.”

What to do: Follow the guidelines in previous entries above. Contact an attic professional. 

How much insulation?

Once you’ve determined your insulation material is safe, your next task is to discover if you have enough to handle the ups and downs of modern climate change. 

Diagnosing insulation shortfall can be tricky. EnergyStar notes the following symptoms: 

  • “Drafty rooms
  • Hot or cold ceilings, walls, or whole rooms; uneven temperature between rooms
  • High heating or cooling bills
  • Ice dams in the winter”

If you suspect insulation issues, examine your attic floor. Is the insulation level even with or below the top of your floor joists? In either case, it’s time for more insulation. 

But what if the insulation rises above the joist level? Use a ruler to measure the depth of your insulation. From there, you can estimate what’s known as an R-value. 

Our old friend, EnergyStar, tells us: “R-Value is a measure of insulation’s ability to resist heat traveling through it. The higher the R-Value, the better the thermal performance of the insulation.” 

  • Cellulose and fiberglass insulation measure about R-3 per inch. 
  • If you live in the Southern United States, you should have at least R-38. 
  • Northern dwellers need around R-49. 
  • If your attic measures R-13 below these figures, consider adding more. 

An attic in Cherry Hill, NJ containing very old insulation. 

Before starting an installation project, make sure to check for air leaks that will require sealing. The Department of Energy offers tips on detecting air leaks and assessing ventilation needs. 

Have A Pro Inspect Your Attic

As you can see, understanding the in’s and out’s of attic insulation can quickly grow complicated. An inspection by a qualified attic professional can save time and money. 

Using a pro will save you from the nasty task of crawling around a dark, dusty space. An inspector will often uncover overlooked issues, including pest problems and undiscovered leaks. And, an inspector knows the warning signs for dangerous attic materials. 

Getting serious about the state of your attic is not only a matter of cost savings. A proper inspection can save money and – more importantly – save your health.

Here is what a properly inspected and insulated attic can look like when you go with the right professionals:

 

Contact us today to discuss how we can help you define exactly what your attic, and home, needs to be healthier.

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A Sappy Attic Is Not A Happy Attic

The Impact Of Poor Attic Ventilation

As we complete more and more attic inspections, it’s becoming a concerning reality that many homeowners have no idea what kind of shape their attic is in.

Not knowing what’s going on with your attic is careless. There’s really no excuse. We understand it can be a “pain” or a “hassle”, but your attic requires the same attention and maintenance as any other area of your home.

We’ve seen health concerns such as fiberglass emitting a synthetic material called styrene, a possible carcinogenic per the American Lung Association. We’ve seen depleted insulation: aged, compressed, and saturated. We’ve seen infestation from sealing issues.

How Hot Attics Impact Your Home’s Health

Even with the aforementioned issues, the one attic issue we see and feel the most is from insufficient ventilation. HOT ATTICS POSE PROBLEMS. Elevated attic temperatures can result in overheated ducts and an overworked air conditioner. Let’s not forget to mention that attic-heat build up radiates into your living space making you hot, resulting in you blasting your air condition. How does that wallet feel?

The photos above show what can happen when you don’t have proper ventilation. Turns out you may not be the only one sweating. Your attic can sweat too. These photos document a hot attic and the residue of tree sap dripping from the rafters. Essentially, the attic was so hot that it was deteriorating.

How Homeowners Can Improve Attic Ventilation

Fortunately for this homeowner, we were able to address the issue in a timely manner. The installation of our solar fan will continuously exchange attic air to avoid future heat build up. In turn, a more efficient air conditioner, cooler ducting, cooler living spaces, and lower cooling costs. They say “don’t sweat the small stuff”. That may be sometimes true, but in your attic’s case, the small stuff can lead to big time problems.

Want to receive a no-cost solar attic fan?

Contact Michele DuCoin at 856-809-2744 to schedule your free attic inspection and learn how to receive a no-cost solar attic fan!

Flip the Bird

There’s only one thing that you can do if you’re a homeowner and you walk up to your attic and see this kind of mess. And that’s “flip the bird”.

We went out for one of our routine attic inspections in LeisureTowne of Southampton, New Jersey. Now we’re accustomed to seeing some pretty crazy things in attics: exposed wires, molding issues from poor ventilation, trash, insufficient insulation, you name it.

Chip Kelly and the Bird Gang, though? We don’t see this very often. Needless to say, it’s a primetime example of why inspecting your attic is important to the health and comfort of your home.

As attic energy savings experts, we called in some friends who could handle the pest control. Then, we proposed sealing improvements, including our NASA inspired multi-layer reflective insulation to help get this attic back into tip-top shape, while helping reduce heating and cooling costs, and improving overall comfort.

That’s what we call killing two birds with one stone.

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A Survey for Our Delaware Valley Neighbors – Part 2

In our previous blog post, we shared the first half of the results from our poll regarding area homeowners and their attic fans. Today we’re sharing the second half of our poll results along with ideas that will get you thinking about attic ventilation for your home. If you missed out on the first half of our poll results, click to read them here.

9%  I have a solar attic fan – works 365 days a year for free

We are conflicted here. We’re proud but sad that only 9% of respondents have a solar attic fan. We wish it was 99%!! The Department of Energy acknowledges the benefits of attic fans – especially the fact that they help reduce energy costs. Add in lowered energy costs with a federal tax credit for installing a solar attic fan, and you’re really getting the most bang for your buck. We are thrilled for the 9% of Delaware Valley homeowners that are saving serious money and energy.

If you aren’t included in this subset of Delaware Valley homeowners, we suggest that you take a look at our page about solar attic fans. Here you can learn about what you’re missing out on (hint: more money savings and fewer headaches).

9%  Oh that thing – it broke a long time ago…

Out of the hundreds of thousands of households in the Delaware Valley, it’s a shame that 9% of homeowners know their attic fan is broken but haven’t gotten it fixed. Energy Star states that the attic is one of the places where you often find the biggest air leaks, which increase your energy bills and make you uncomfortably hot in the summer and cold in the winter.

A broken attic fan not only puts the well-being of your home and family at risk (this is a huge fire hazard), but it also takes its toll on your wallet and your sanity during the extremes of the Delaware Valley seasons. We’ll come out and inspect your home for free and give you expert advice to optimize your attic – all you need to do is let us know that you need our assistance!

9%  You got me curious, I will contact you for an attic inspection.

This is great! The attic is one of the most forgotten rooms in your home, but it is also one of the most important rooms when it comes to regulating the temperature of your home. Send us a message, call us at 856-809-2744, or attend one of our free dinner presentations. We would love to tell you about the benefits of solar attic fans and help make your home more energy efficient.

0%  No idea if I have a fan or not. Do I need one?

Thankfully, nobody chose this response! If you aren’t sure about the state of your attic, view some of our findings at one of our neighbor’s homes in Cherry Hill. Your attic should be healthy and energy efficient, and free of mold, depleted insulation, exposed electrical wires, and rotting wood. If you find yourself in this category as you’re reading this article, drop us a line! We’ll come out and inspect your attic for free with no pressure – just discussion.