Adding insulation to your attic is one of the most effective ways to save money on electricity bills and make your home energy efficient.

However, there are many things to consider when applying attic insulation, as it involves buying the right equipment, knowing how much material to buy, and hiring the right type of labor. Not only that, but there are also federal, state, and local regulations regarding home insulation that needs to be taken into account before embarking on this process.

Alaska homeowners will need to optimize these various components to make sure they’re getting the best possible attic insulation for their homes. In this article, we discuss which components Alaska residents need to keep an eye on to make sure their attic stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.

Alaska Attic Insulation Guide

What type of insulation is best for Alaska attics?

Depending on which parts of your attic you’re trying to insulate, we recommend two different types of insulation material.

Alaska Attic Insulation Types

Floor Insulation

For attic floors, there are two main types of insulation: roll and batt insulation and loose-fill or blown-in insulation. Batt and roll work best between joist and stud spaces, or for wide-open spaces or crawl spaces. Blown-in insulation works best for extremely tight spaces, or if an area already has insulation installed but needs a little more to top it off. They’re also useful for filling wood joists, as they allow air through the spaces and require insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

In Alaska, it’s more likely than not that your attic is going to need insulation in tight spaces. Blown-in insulation is perfect for that scenario, as it provides better coverage in smaller areas and is less expensive than roll and batt insulation. You can purchase fiberglass or cellulose insulation, whichever you prefer. Just remember that installing blown-in insulation is going to require a special insulation blowing machine that you’ll likely need to rent.

Roof Insulation

For insulation under your roof, we recommend using multi-layer reflective insulation. That might sound complicated, but we assure you it’s quite simple and is extremely beneficial for efficiently heating or cooling your home.

During the summer months, the sun’s radiant energy heats your roof shingles, which then transfers that heat into your attic through conduction. Your attic then becomes much hotter and stuffy, and the heat travels down into the rest of your home, making the entire house hot. During the winter, it has the opposite effect, as the heat generated by your heaters escapes through the attic walls.

Multi-layer reflective insulation addresses this issue by reflecting radiant heat rather than letting your attic absorb it. Thus, radiant heat can’t get through your attic roof and walls as easily, allowing your attic and the rest of your home to be better air-conditioned. During the winter, the heat generated from inside will also be reflected back into the attic and home, making your home that much warmer.

Alaska has multiple climate zones that include an arctic type in the extreme north, oceanic to subpolar oceanic in the southeast and southwest, and subarctic continental in the interior and southcentral regions. Patches of cold semi-arid type regions lie in the extreme north-central and east.

Knowing which materials to use is a key step in the process. The subsequent component deals with just how much attic insulation you’re going to need for your Alaska home.

How much attic insulation do you need in Alaska?

To determine how much insulation you’re going to need, measure the length times the width of the attic or whichever space you’re trying to insulate to get the square footage. For blown-in insulation, reference the back of the package to determine the proper height to get the correct R-value for your project.

The R-value is a measurement of thermal resistance, or how much the insulation can properly resist heat flow. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation will be in keeping warm air in or out of your attic. 

Depending on where you are in the United States, the R-value that you’ll need is going to differ due to varying climate conditions. In fact, there are 8 different climate zones designated by the U.S. Department of Energy that has different R-value recommendations for attics, basements, and other walls. Due to the geographical location and coverage of Alaska, the State falls into two climate zones.

Alaska Attic Insulation R-value

Climate Zone 7 & 8 include Aleutias East, Aleutians West Census Area Anchorage, Bethel Census Area Bristol Bay, Denali, Dillingham Census Area, Fairbanks North Star, Haines, Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Juneau, Kenai Peninsula, Ketchikan Gateway, Kodiak Island, Lake and Peninsula, Matanuska-Susitna, Nome Census Area, North Slope, Northwest Artic, Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census Area, Sitka, Skagway, Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Wade Hampton Census Area, Wrangell, Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area, Yakutat, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area. For Zone 7 & 8, a ceiling R-value of 49 is recommended, whereas the floor R-value should be at least 38.

Thus, square footage and R-values are important determinants of how much insulation you’re going to need for your attic. If you’re unsure about exactly how much insulation you’re going to need, there are R-value calculators online, or you can call a contractor for an accurate quote.

How much does attic insulation cost in Alaska?

Once you’ve figured out what insulation you need and how much needs to be installed, you’re on your way to contacting a contractor and starting the process. But before you do so, it’s important to understand the costs involved with attic insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

Generally speaking, attic insulation can cost anywhere from $1,100 to $1,500, or between $1.50 to $3.50 per foot, depending on the material you choose and how much space you need to cover. As we noted earlier, blown-in insulation is the cheapest option. However, contractors often charge around $70 an hour, and in some cases, you might need to hire an electrician to make sure you aren’t disrupting any junction boxes or cables when insulating the attic. Electricians charge up to $85 an hour.

For Alaska homes, the cost of insulating your attic doesn’t necessarily vary a whole lot, but it’s still important to research average costs depending on where you live. Every house is going to be different, and every city or county is going to have different code regulations. Make sure you check your local building codes for not only R-values but also vapor barrier requirements.

For example, homeowners in Anchorage, Alaska paid on average $1,759 for attic insulation. Compare that to another city in Alaska, say Fairbanks, the average cost is about $1,843.  And also Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Alaska.

Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Alaska, making it a reliable tool for determining your budget. Even Manta, however, recognizes that their estimates do not include things like permit costs, inspection fees, and labor fees, as that often varies depending on location and contractor rates.

Before contacting a professional to start applying insulation, ask yourself these questions about attic-dependent work outside of insulation:

  • Is everything in your attic air sealed? Do you need to fix your ductwork to prevent moisture buildup?
  • Does your attic have good ventilation? Does everything that’s ventilating into the attic have a way out of it?
  • Is there any mold in your attic? Have you contracted someone to come remove said mold?

If you have all of these bases covered, your attic insulation budget will be far more accurate. Contractors will also have an easier time getting your attic checked and insulated if you’ve taken care of the listed components.

Incentives, tax credits, rebates, and savings programs

Here are programs that are available to Alaska homeowners looking to add insulation:

Residential Weatherization Program

The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) administers the Weatherization Program through grants to local service providers. Alaska residents that meet income criteria are eligible to receive weatherization services from their local provider at no cost. The program is available to homeowners and renters. Homes that have been weatherized prior to 2008 may also apply. Interested residents should contact a weatherization provider to apply; the list of providers is available on the AHFC program website.  

Residences participating in the Home Energy Rebate or New Home Rebate Program may not also participate in the Weatherization Program. 

How to hire an Alaska attic insulation contractor?

Once you’ve figured out your attic insulation cost, what types of insulation you need, and how much of it that’s needed, it’s most likely time to find the contractor who can handle the process.

Get an attic inspection

An insulation contractor will be able to properly inspect your attic and decide the necessary steps to take for updating your home’s insulation. You can consult with contractors about what type of insulation to use, R-values, and many of the other components we discussed earlier. 

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

But choosing the right contractor is going to make or break the process, and it can be difficult to choose between tens of dozens of professionals who claim that they’re the best in the business. We’ve identified a few things to keep in mind when hiring an attic insulation contractor.

Make sure they are thorough

First and foremost, pick someone who is thorough and transparent about your attic. If your contractor comes by your house for an inspection, and they perform various diagnostic tests and look through every corner of your attic, that’s an indication of their experience and reliability. Beware of contractors who take a quick peek in your attic and simply suggest putting in a few inches of insulation. A good contractor should initiate conversations about your attic’s insulation and ventilation issues and provide detailed steps on how to move forward. 

Check online reviews

But don’t base your decision on just a single interaction with the contractor. Go online and look through their services and offers. If they provide things like lifetime warranties, that means a contractor is not only confident in their work, but they’re also willing to follow up on their services to make sure you’re getting your money’s worth. Check their online reviews as well to see what others are saying about a contractor. If reviews are generally positive, that’s a sign of a reliable contractor. 

Attic insulation is anything but simple, but Alaska homeowners will greatly benefit from doing the proper research and spending their money on the right services and products. A properly insulated attic translates into a much more comfortable and energy-efficient home. 

Adding insulation to your attic is one of the most effective ways to save money on electricity bills and make your home energy efficient.

However, there are many things to consider when applying attic insulation, as it involves buying the right equipment, knowing how much material to buy, and hiring the right type of labor. Not only that, but there are also federal, state, and local regulations regarding home insulation that needs to be taken into account before embarking on this process.

Alabama homeowners will need to optimize these various components to make sure they’re getting the best possible attic insulation for their homes. In this article, we discuss which components Alabama residents need to keep an eye on to make sure their attic stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.

Alabama Attic Insulation Guide

What type of insulation is best for Alabama attics?

Depending on which parts of your attic you’re trying to insulate, we recommend two different types of insulation material.

Alabama Attic Insulation Types

Floor Insulation

For attic floors, there are two main types of insulation: roll and batt insulation and loose-fill or blown-in insulation. Batt and roll work best between joist and stud spaces, or for wide-open spaces or crawl spaces. Blown-in insulation works best for extremely tight spaces, or if an area already has insulation installed but needs a little more to top it off. They’re also useful for filling wood joists, as they allow air through the spaces and require insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

In Alabama, it’s more likely than not that your attic is going to need insulation in tight spaces. Blown-in insulation is perfect for that scenario, as it provides better coverage in smaller areas and is less expensive than roll and batt insulation. You can purchase fiberglass or cellulose insulation, whichever you prefer. Just remember that installing blown-in insulation is going to require a special insulation blowing machine that you’ll likely need to rent.

Roof Insulation

For insulation under your roof, we recommend using multi-layer reflective insulation. That might sound complicated, but we assure you it’s quite simple and is extremely beneficial for efficiently heating or cooling your home.

During the summer months, the sun’s radiant energy heats your roof shingles, which then transfers that heat into your attic through conduction. Your attic then becomes much hotter and stuffy, and the heat travels down into the rest of your home, making the entire house hot. During the winter, it has the opposite effect, as the heat generated by your heaters escapes through the attic walls.

Multi-layer reflective insulation addresses this issue by reflecting radiant heat rather than letting your attic absorb it. Thus, radiant heat can’t get through your attic roof and walls as easily, allowing your attic and the rest of your home to be better air-conditioned. During the winter, the heat generated from inside will also be reflected back into the attic and home, making your home that much warmer.

Alabama climate is of humid subtropical type with very hot summers, mild winters, and precipitation throughout the year. Alabama lies in the tornado-prone Dixie Alley of the southeastern part of the United States. Georgia in the east, Florida in the southeast, the Gulf of Mexico in the south, Mississippi in the west, and Tennessee in the north share borders with the state. The warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, latitudes close to the equator than the pole, and tropical systems mainly influence the climate.

Knowing which materials to use is a key step in the process. The subsequent component deals with just how much attic insulation you’re going to need for your Alabama home.

How much attic insulation do you need in Alabama?

To determine how much insulation you’re going to need, measure the length times the width of the attic or whichever space you’re trying to insulate to get the square footage. For blown-in insulation, reference the back of the package to determine the proper height to get the correct R-value for your project.

The R-value is a measurement of thermal resistance, or how much the insulation can properly resist heat flow. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation will be in keeping warm air in or out of your attic. 

Depending on where you are in the United States, the R-value that you’ll need is going to differ due to varying climate conditions. In fact, there are 8 different climate zones designated by the U.S. Department of Energy that has different R-value recommendations for attics, basements, and other walls. Due to the geographical location and coverage of Alabama, the State falls into two climate zone.

Alabama Attic Insulation R-value

Due to the geographical location and coverage of Alabama, the State falls into two climate zone.  And the under the Zone map: Climate Zone 3 includes Autauga, Barbour, Bibb, Blout, Bullock, Butler, Calhoun, Chambers, Cherokee, Chilton, Choctaw, Clarke, Clay, Cleburne, Coffee, Colbert, Conecuh, Coosa, Covington, Crenshaw, Cullman, Dale, Dallas, De Kalb, Elmore, Escambia, Etowah, Fayette, Franklin, Geneva, Greene, Hale, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jefferson, Lamar, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Lee, Limestone, Lowndes, Macon, Madison, Marengo, Marion, Marshall, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Pickens, Pike, Randolph, Russell, Shelby, St. Clair, Sumter, Talladega, Tallapoosa, Tuscaloosa, Walker, Washington, Wilcox, Winston. For Zone 3, a ceiling R-value of 38 is recommended, whereas the floor R-value should be at least 19.

For Zone 2 includes Baldwin and Mobile, and a ceiling R-value of 38 is recommended, whereas the floor R-value should be at least 13. Some counties might experience harsher seasonal variations and therefore require higher R-value insulation. The R-value will also depend on whether or not there is already insulation installed in your attic prior to the procedure. Typically, attics without any prior insulation are going to require higher R-values for better insulation.

Thus, square footage and R-values are important determinants of how much insulation you’re going to need for your attic. If you’re unsure about exactly how much insulation you’re going to need, there are R-value calculators online, or you can call a contractor for an accurate quote.

How much does attic insulation cost in Alabama?

Once you’ve figured out what insulation you need and how much needs to be installed, you’re on your way to contacting a contractor and starting the process. But before you do so, it’s important to understand the costs involved with attic insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

Generally speaking, attic insulation can cost anywhere from $1,100 to $1,500, or between $1.50 to $3.50 per foot, depending on the material you choose and how much space you need to cover. As we noted earlier, blown-in insulation is the cheapest option. However, contractors often charge around $70 an hour, and in some cases, you might need to hire an electrician to make sure you aren’t disrupting any junction boxes or cables when insulating the attic. Electricians charge up to $85 an hour.

For Alabama homes, the cost of insulating your attic doesn’t necessarily vary a whole lot, but it’s still important to research average costs depending on where you live. Every house is going to be different, and every city or county is going to have different code regulations. Make sure you check your local building codes for not only R-values but also vapor barrier requirements.

For example, homeowners in Birmingham, Alabama paid on average $1,351 for attic insulation. Compare that to another city in Alabama, say Montgomery, the average cost is about $1,433. 

Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Alabama, making it a reliable tool for determining your budget. Even Manta, however, recognizes that their estimates do not include things like permit costs, inspection fees, and labor fees, as that often varies depending on location and contractor rates.

Before contacting a professional to start applying insulation, ask yourself these questions about attic-dependent work outside of insulation:

  • Is everything in your attic air sealed? Do you need to fix your ductwork to prevent moisture buildup?
  • Does your attic have good ventilation? Does everything that’s ventilating into the attic have a way out of it?
  • Is there any mold in your attic? Have you contracted someone to come remove said mold?

If you have all of these bases covered, your attic insulation budget will be far more accurate. Contractors will also have an easier time getting your attic checked and insulated if you’ve taken care of the listed components.

Incentives, tax credits, rebates, and savings programs

Here are programs that are available to Alabama homeowners looking to add insulation:

Energy Efficiency Loan Program

Central Alabama Electric Cooperative offers the Co-Op Energy Efficiency Loan Program to its residential customers. This program is offered through an agreement with the Alabama One Credit Union (ARECU) or Regions Bank. Projects that qualify for this loan include heat pumps, duct repair, building insulation, air sealing, heat pump water heaters, water heater blanket and pipe insulation, attic ventilation, doors, windows, window tinting, programmable thermostats, and mobile home skirting. All installations and improvements must be performed by a licensed contractor. To begin the process, contact Cindy Browder at (800) 545-5735 ext. 2118 or at .

How to hire an Alabama attic insulation contractor?

Once you’ve figured out your attic insulation cost, what types of insulation you need, and how much of it that’s needed, it’s most likely time to find the contractor who can handle the process.

Get an attic inspection

An insulation contractor will be able to properly inspect your attic and decide the necessary steps to take for updating your home’s insulation. You can consult with contractors about what type of insulation to use, R-values, and many of the other components we discussed earlier. 

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

But choosing the right contractor is going to make or break the process, and it can be difficult to choose between tens of dozens of professionals who claim that they’re the best in the business. We’ve identified a few things to keep in mind when hiring an attic insulation contractor.

Make sure they are thorough

First and foremost, pick someone who is thorough and transparent about your attic. If your contractor comes by your house for an inspection, and they perform various diagnostic tests and look through every corner of your attic, that’s an indication of their experience and reliability. Beware of contractors who take a quick peek in your attic and simply suggest putting in a few inches of insulation. A good contractor should initiate conversations about your attic’s insulation and ventilation issues and provide detailed steps on how to move forward. 

Check online reviews

But don’t base your decision on just a single interaction with the contractor. Go online and look through their services and offers. If they provide things like lifetime warranties, that means a contractor is not only confident in their work, but they’re also willing to follow up on their services to make sure you’re getting your money’s worth. Check their online reviews as well to see what others are saying about a contractor. If reviews are generally positive, that’s a sign of a reliable contractor. 

Attic insulation is anything but simple, but Alabama homeowners will greatly benefit from doing the proper research and spending their money on the right services and products. A properly insulated attic translates into a much more comfortable and energy-efficient home.

Adding insulation to your attic is one of the most effective ways to save money on electricity bills and make your home energy efficient.

However, there are many things to consider when applying attic insulation, as it involves buying the right equipment, knowing how much material to buy, and hiring the right type of labor. Not only that, but there are also federal, state, and local regulations regarding home insulation that needs to be taken into account before embarking on this process.

Idaho homeowners will need to optimize these various components to make sure they’re getting the best possible attic insulation for their homes. In this article, we discuss which components Idaho residents need to keep an eye on to make sure their attic stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.

Idaho Attic Insulation Guide

What type of insulation is best for Idaho attics?

Depending on which parts of your attic you’re trying to insulate, we recommend two different types of insulation material.

Idaho Attic Insulation Types

Floor Insulation

For attic floors, there are two main types of insulation: roll and batt insulation and loose-fill or blown-in insulation. Batt and roll work best between joist and stud spaces, or for wide-open spaces or crawl spaces. Blown-in insulation works best for extremely tight spaces, or if an area already has insulation installed but needs a little more to top it off. They’re also useful for filling wood joists, as they allow air through the spaces and require insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

In Idaho, it’s more likely than not that your attic is going to need insulation in tight spaces. Blown-in insulation is perfect for that scenario, as it provides better coverage in smaller areas and is less expensive than roll and batt insulation. You can purchase fiberglass or cellulose insulation, whichever you prefer. Just remember that installing blown-in insulation is going to require a special insulation blowing machine that you’ll likely need to rent.

Roof Insulation

For insulation under your roof, we recommend using multi-layer reflective insulation. That might sound complicated, but we assure you it’s quite simple and is extremely beneficial for efficiently heating or cooling your home.

During the summer months, the sun’s radiant energy heats your roof shingles, which then transfers that heat into your attic through conduction. Your attic then becomes much hotter and stuffy, and the heat travels down into the rest of your home, making the entire house hot. During the winter, it has the opposite effect, as the heat generated by your heaters escapes through the attic walls.

Multi-layer reflective insulation addresses this issue by reflecting radiant heat rather than letting your attic absorb it. Thus, radiant heat can’t get through your attic roof and walls as easily, allowing your attic and the rest of your home to be better air-conditioned. During the winter, the heat generated from inside will also be reflected back into the attic and home, making your home that much warmer.

Idaho has diverse climate types, with a predominantly continental flavor in the central and eastern regions. The western portion has a maritime influence from the Pacific Ocean. The Pacific Ocean exerts a maritime influence in the north and west of Idaho, which results in cloudy, humid, and wet winters. The eastern part is free of the oceanic influence and exhibits the reverse pattern of wet summers and dry winters.

Knowing which materials to use is a key step in the process. The subsequent component deals with just how much attic insulation you’re going to need for your Idaho home.

How much attic insulation do you need in Idaho?

To determine how much insulation you’re going to need, measure the length times the width of the attic or whichever space you’re trying to insulate to get the square footage. For blown-in insulation, reference the back of the package to determine the proper height to get the correct R-value for your project.

The R-value is a measurement of thermal resistance, or how much the insulation can properly resist heat flow. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation will be in keeping warm air in or out of your attic. 

Depending on where you are in the United States, the R-value that you’ll need is going to differ due to varying climate conditions. In fact, there are 8 different climate zones designated by the U.S. Department of Energy that has different R-value recommendations for attics, basements, and other walls. Due to the geographical location and coverage of Idaho, the State falls into two climate zones.

Idaho Attic Insulation R-value

Climate Zone 6 includes Adams, Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Blaine, Boise, Bonneville, Boundary, Butte, Camas, Caribou, Clark, Custer, Franklin, Fremont, Jefferson, Lemhi, Madison, Oneida, Teton and Valley. For Zone 6, a ceiling R-value of 49 is recommended, whereas the floor R-value should be at least 30.

For Zone 5 includes Ada, Benewah, Canyon, Cassia, Clearwater, Elmore, Gem, Gooding, Idaho, Jerome, Kootenai, Latah, Lewis, Lincoln, Minidoka, Nez, Perce, Owyhee, and, Payette, Power, Shoshone, Twin, Falls and Washington, and a ceiling R-value of 49 is recommended, whereas the floor R-value should be at least 30.

Thus, square footage and R-values are important determinants of how much insulation you’re going to need for your attic. If you’re unsure about exactly how much insulation you’re going to need, there are R-value calculators online, or you can call a contractor for an accurate quote.

How much does attic insulation cost in Idaho?

Once you’ve figured out what insulation you need and how much needs to be installed, you’re on your way to contacting a contractor and starting the process. But before you do so, it’s important to understand the costs involved with attic insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

Once you’ve figured out what insulation you need and how much needs to be installed, you’re on your way to contacting a contractor and starting the process. But before you do so, it’s important to understand the costs involved with attic insulation.

Generally speaking, attic insulation can cost anywhere from $1,100 to $1,500, or between $1.50 to $3.50 per foot, depending on the material you choose and how much space you need to cover. As we noted earlier, blown-in insulation is the cheapest option. However, contractors often charge around $70 an hour, and in some cases, you might need to hire an electrician to make sure you aren’t disrupting any junction boxes or cables when insulating the attic. Electricians charge up to $85 an hour.

For Idaho homes, the cost of insulating your attic doesn’t necessarily vary a whole lot, but it’s still important to research average costs depending on where you live. Every house is going to be different, and every city or county is going to have different code regulations. Make sure you check your local building codes for not only R-values but also vapor barrier requirements.

For example, homeowners in Boise City, Idaho paid on average $1,446 for attic insulation. Compare that to another city in Idaho, say Idaho Falls, the average cost is about $1,377.  And also Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Idaho.

Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Idaho , making it a reliable tool for determining your budget. Even Manta, however, recognizes that their estimates do not include things like permit costs, inspection fees, and labor fees, as that often varies depending on location and contractor rates.

Before contacting a professional to start applying insulation, ask yourself these questions about attic-dependent work outside of insulation:

  • Is everything in your attic air sealed? Do you need to fix your ductwork to prevent moisture buildup?
  • Does your attic have good ventilation? Does everything that’s ventilating into the attic have a way out of it?
  • Is there any mold in your attic? Have you contracted someone to come remove said mold?

If you have all of these bases covered, your attic insulation budget will be far more accurate. Contractors will also have an easier time getting your attic checked and insulated if you’ve taken care of the listed components.

Incentives, tax credits, rebates, and savings programs

Here are programs that are available to Idaho homeowners looking to add insulation:

Residential Energy Efficiency Tax Credit

Idaho residents with homes built or under construction before 2002, or who had a building permit issued before January 1, 2002, qualify for an income tax deduction for 100% of the cost of installing new insulation or other approved energy efficiency improvements in an existing residence. Any insulation added must be in addition to, not a replacement of existing insulation. Other energy efficiency measures that may be deducted are windows that are more energy efficient than existing windows, storm windows, weather stripping and caulking, and duct sealing and insulation.  Efficiency measures must meet or exceed the criteria for the component in the version of Idaho’s energy code in effect in the year the improvement was made. The home must be the primary residence and located within the State of Idaho to qualify for the deduction.

Customers should claim the deduction on forms from the Idaho State Tax Commission; contact the Idaho State Tax Commission for the most recent form.

How to hire an Idaho attic insulation contractor?

Once you’ve figured out your attic insulation cost, what types of insulation you need, and how much of it that’s needed, it’s most likely time to find the contractor who can handle the process.

Get an attic inspection

An insulation contractor will be able to properly inspect your attic and decide the necessary steps to take for updating your home’s insulation. You can consult with contractors about what type of insulation to use, R-values, and many of the other components we discussed earlier.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

But choosing the right contractor is going to make or break the process, and it can be difficult to choose between tens of dozens of professionals who claim that they’re the best in the business. We’ve identified a few things to keep in mind when hiring an attic insulation contractor.

Make sure they are thorough

First and foremost, pick someone who is thorough and transparent about your attic. If your contractor comes by your house for an inspection, and they perform various diagnostic tests and look through every corner of your attic, that’s an indication of their experience and reliability. Beware of contractors who take a quick peek in your attic and simply suggest putting in a few inches of insulation. A good contractor should initiate conversations about your attic’s insulation and ventilation issues and provide detailed steps on how to move forward. 

Check online reviews

But don’t base your decision on just a single interaction with the contractor. Go online and look through their services and offers. If they provide things like lifetime warranties, that means a contractor is not only confident in their work, but they’re also willing to follow up on their services to make sure you’re getting your money’s worth. Check their online reviews as well to see what others are saying about a contractor. If reviews are generally positive, that’s a sign of a reliable contractor. 

Attic insulation is anything but simple, but Idaho homeowners will greatly benefit from doing the proper research and spending their money on the right services and products. A properly insulated attic translates into a much more comfortable and energy-efficient home.

Adding insulation to your attic is one of the most effective ways to save money on electricity bills and make your home energy efficient.

However, there are many things to consider when applying attic insulation, as it involves buying the right equipment, knowing how much material to buy, and hiring the right type of labor. Not only that, but there are also federal, state, and local regulations regarding home insulation that needs to be taken into account before embarking on this process.

Connecticut homeowners will need to optimize these various components to make sure they’re getting the best possible attic insulation for their homes. In this article, we discuss which components Connecticut residents need to keep an eye on to make sure their attic stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.

Connecticut Attic Insulation Guide

What type of insulation is best for Connecticut attics?

Depending on which parts of your attic you’re trying to insulate, we recommend two different types of insulation material.

Connecticut Attic Insulation Types

Floor Insulation

For attic floors, there are two main types of insulation: roll and batt insulation and loose-fill or blown-in insulation. Batt and roll work best between joist and stud spaces, or for wide-open spaces or crawl spaces. Blown-in insulation works best for extremely tight spaces, or if an area already has insulation installed but needs a little more to top it off. They’re also useful for filling wood joists, as they allow air through the spaces and require insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

In Connecticut, it’s more likely than not that your attic is going to need insulation in tight spaces. Blown-in insulation is perfect for that scenario, as it provides better coverage in smaller areas and is less expensive than roll and batt insulation. You can purchase fiberglass or cellulose insulation, whichever you prefer. Just remember that installing blown-in insulation is going to require a special insulation blowing machine that you’ll likely need to rent.

Roof Insulation

For insulation under your roof, we recommend using multi-layer reflective insulation. That might sound complicated, but we assure you it’s quite simple and is extremely beneficial for efficiently heating or cooling your home.

During the summer months, the sun’s radiant energy heats your roof shingles, which then transfers that heat into your attic through conduction. Your attic then becomes much hotter and stuffy, and the heat travels down into the rest of your home, making the entire house hot. During the winter, it has the opposite effect, as the heat generated by your heaters escapes through the attic walls.

Multi-layer reflective insulation addresses this issue by reflecting radiant heat rather than letting your attic absorb it. Thus, radiant heat can’t get through your attic roof and walls as easily, allowing your attic and the rest of your home to be better air-conditioned. During the winter, the heat generated from inside will also be reflected back into the attic and home, making your home that much warmer.

Connecticut’s climate ranges from humid continental type in the north to humid subtropical in the south. Summers are hot and humid, while winters range from mild on the coast to cold and snowy in the interior. 

Knowing which materials to use is a key step in the process. The subsequent component deals with just how much attic insulation you’re going to need for your Connecticut home.

How much attic insulation do you need in Connecticut?

To determine how much insulation you’re going to need, measure the length times the width of the attic or whichever space you’re trying to insulate to get the square footage. For blown-in insulation, reference the back of the package to determine the proper height to get the correct R-value for your project.

The R-value is a measurement of thermal resistance, or how much the insulation can properly resist heat flow. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation will be in keeping warm air in or out of your attic. 

Depending on where you are in the United States, the R-value that you’ll need is going to differ due to varying climate conditions. In fact, there are 8 different climate zones designated by the U.S. Department of Energy that has different R-value recommendations for attics, basements, and other walls. Due to the geographical location and coverage of Connecticut, the State falls into one climate zone.

Connecticut Attic Insulation R-value

Climate Zone 5 includes Fairfield, Hartford, Litchfield, Middlesex, New, Have, New, London, Tolland and Windham. For Zone 5, a ceiling R-value of 49 is recommended, whereas the floor R-value should be at least 30.

Thus, square footage and R-values are important determinants of how much insulation you’re going to need for your attic. If you’re unsure about exactly how much insulation you’re going to need, there are R-value calculators online, or you can call a contractor for an accurate quote.

How much does attic insulation cost in Connecticut?

Once you’ve figured out what insulation you need and how much needs to be installed, you’re on your way to contacting a contractor and starting the process. But before you do so, it’s important to understand the costs involved with attic insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

Once you’ve figured out what insulation you need and how much needs to be installed, you’re on your way to contacting a contractor and starting the process. But before you do so, it’s important to understand the costs involved with attic insulation.

Generally speaking, attic insulation can cost anywhere from $1,100 to $1,500, or between $1.50 to $3.50 per foot, depending on the material you choose and how much space you need to cover. As we noted earlier, blown-in insulation is the cheapest option. However, contractors often charge around $70 an hour, and in some cases, you might need to hire an electrician to make sure you aren’t disrupting any junction boxes or cables when insulating the attic. Electricians charge up to $85 an hour.

For Connecticut homes, the cost of insulating your attic doesn’t necessarily vary a whole lot, but it’s still important to research average costs depending on where you live. Every house is going to be different, and every city or county is going to have different code regulations. Make sure you check your local building codes for not only R-values but also vapor barrier requirements.

For example, homeowners in Bridgeport, Connecticut paid on average $1,485 for attic insulation. Compare that to another city in Connecticut, say Waterbury, the average cost is about $1,522.  And also Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Connecticut.

Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Connecticut, making it a reliable tool for determining your budget. Even Manta, however, recognizes that their estimates do not include things like permit costs, inspection fees, and labor fees, as that often varies depending on location and contractor rates.

Before contacting a professional to start applying insulation, ask yourself these questions about attic-dependent work outside of insulation:

  • Is everything in your attic air sealed? Do you need to fix your ductwork to prevent moisture buildup?
  • Does your attic have good ventilation? Does everything that’s ventilating into the attic have a way out of it?
  • Is there any mold in your attic? Have you contracted someone to come remove said mold?

If you have all of these bases covered, your attic insulation budget will be far more accurate. Contractors will also have an easier time getting your attic checked and insulated if you’ve taken care of the listed components.

Incentives, tax credits, rebates, and savings programs

Here are programs that are available to Connecticut homeowners looking to add insulation:

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

Groton Utilities offers a variety of rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient equipment. All items must meet or exceed efficiency standards included in the program guidelines. For customers with electrically heated homes, Groton Utilities offers the Home Energy Savings Program which provides incentives for efficiency measures such as air sealing, duct testing and sealing, hot-water saving measures, rebates for appliance replacements, installation of CFLs, and insulation upgrades.

This program has three incentives: For the first one, the technology applied is Lighting, Duct/Air sealing, Building Insulation, Other EE to a residential level, and the incentive has a maximum of $1000.00. Another one is for Water Heaters, applied for Low Income Residential sector, and the incentive is 500.00 $/Unit. The last incentive has as technology Level-2 Electric Vehicle Service Equipment at residential level, and has a minimum of 250.00 $/Unit and a maximum of 500.00 $/Unit.

How to hire a Connecticut attic insulation contractor?

Once you’ve figured out your attic insulation cost, what types of insulation you need, and how much of it that’s needed, it’s most likely time to find the contractor who can handle the process.

Get an attic inspection

An insulation contractor will be able to properly inspect your attic and decide the necessary steps to take for updating your home’s insulation. You can consult with contractors about what type of insulation to use, R-values, and many of the other components we discussed earlier.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

But choosing the right contractor is going to make or break the process, and it can be difficult to choose between tens of dozens of professionals who claim that they’re the best in the business. We’ve identified a few things to keep in mind when hiring an attic insulation contractor.

Make sure they are thorough

First and foremost, pick someone who is thorough and transparent about your attic. If your contractor comes by your house for an inspection, and they perform various diagnostic tests and look through every corner of your attic, that’s an indication of their experience and reliability. Beware of contractors who take a quick peek in your attic and simply suggest putting in a few inches of insulation. A good contractor should initiate conversations about your attic’s insulation and ventilation issues and provide detailed steps on how to move forward. 

Check online reviews

But don’t base your decision on just a single interaction with the contractor. Go online and look through their services and offers. If they provide things like lifetime warranties, that means a contractor is not only confident in their work, but they’re also willing to follow up on their services to make sure you’re getting your money’s worth. Check their online reviews as well to see what others are saying about a contractor. If reviews are generally positive, that’s a sign of a reliable contractor. 

Attic insulation is anything but simple, but Connecticut homeowners will greatly benefit from doing the proper research and spending their money on the right services and products. A properly insulated attic translates into a much more comfortable and energy-efficient home.

Adding insulation to your attic is one of the most effective ways to save money on electricity bills and make your home energy efficient.

However, there are many things to consider when applying attic insulation, as it involves buying the right equipment, knowing how much material to buy, and hiring the right type of labor. Not only that, but there are also federal, state, and local regulations regarding home insulation that needs to be taken into account before embarking on this process.

Indiana homeowners will need to optimize these various components to make sure they’re getting the best possible attic insulation for their homes. In this article, we discuss which components Indiana residents need to keep an eye on to make sure their attic stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.

Indiana Attic Insulation Guide

What type of insulation is best for Indiana attics?

Depending on which parts of your attic you’re trying to insulate, we recommend two different types of insulation material.

Indiana Attic Insulation Types

Floor Insulation

For attic floors, there are two main types of insulation: roll and batt insulation and loose-fill or blown-in insulation. Batt and roll work best between joist and stud spaces, or for wide-open spaces or crawl spaces. Blown-in insulation works best for extremely tight spaces, or if an area already has insulation installed but needs a little more to top it off. They’re also useful for filling wood joists, as they allow air through the spaces and require insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

In Indiana, it’s more likely than not that your attic is going to need insulation in tight spaces. Blown-in insulation is perfect for that scenario, as it provides better coverage in smaller areas and is less expensive than roll and batt insulation. You can purchase fiberglass or cellulose insulation, whichever you prefer. Just remember that installing blown-in insulation is going to require a special insulation blowing machine that you’ll likely need to rent.

Roof Insulation

For insulation under your roof, we recommend using multi-layer reflective insulation. That might sound complicated, but we assure you it’s quite simple and is extremely beneficial for efficiently heating or cooling your home.

During the summer months, the sun’s radiant energy heats your roof shingles, which then transfers that heat into your attic through conduction. Your attic then becomes much hotter and stuffy, and the heat travels down into the rest of your home, making the entire house hot. During the winter, it has the opposite effect, as the heat generated by your heaters escapes through the attic walls.

Multi-layer reflective insulation addresses this issue by reflecting radiant heat rather than letting your attic absorb it. Thus, radiant heat can’t get through your attic roof and walls as easily, allowing your attic and the rest of your home to be better air-conditioned. During the winter, the heat generated from inside will also be reflected back into the attic and home, making your home that much warmer.

Indiana experiences a humid continental type of climate in the northern and central regions of the state and a humid subtropical climate in the south. Hot summers and cold winters are typical, with a gradual increase in warmth in the southern regions. Indiana has strongly marked seasons with an invigorating climate. Summers are hot, humid, and wet, whereas winters are cold and bitter. Cold air masses from the polar areas move southward, and hot air from the tropics moves northward to produce frequent weather changes in the winter. Spring is an active season for tornadoes and thunderstorms as the weather changes from cold to hot. Autumn has mostly sunny skies and pleasant temperatures with low humidity.

Knowing which materials to use is a key step in the process. The subsequent component deals with just how much attic insulation you’re going to need for your Indiana home.

How much attic insulation do you need in Indiana?

To determine how much insulation you’re going to need, measure the length times the width of the attic or whichever space you’re trying to insulate to get the square footage. For blown-in insulation, reference the back of the package to determine the proper height to get the correct R-value for your project.

The R-value is a measurement of thermal resistance, or how much the insulation can properly resist heat flow. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation will be in keeping warm air in or out of your attic. 

Depending on where you are in the United States, the R-value that you’ll need is going to differ due to varying climate conditions. In fact, there are 8 different climate zones designated by the U.S. Department of Energy that has different R-value recommendations for attics, basements, and other walls. Due to the geographical location and coverage of Indiana, the State falls into two climate zones.

Indiana Attic Insulation R-value

Climate Zone 5 includes Adams, Elkhart, Jay, Noble, Tipton, Allen, Fayette, Johnson, Owen, Union, Bartholomew, Fountain, Kosciusko, Parke, Vermillion, Benton, Franklin, La Porte, Porter, Vigo, Blackford, Fulton, Lagrange, Pulaski, Wabash, Bone, Grant, Lake, Putnam, Warren, Carroll, Hamilton, Madison, Randolph, Wayne, Cass, Hancock, Marion, Rush, Wells, Clay, Hendricks, Marshall, Shelby, White, Clinton, Miami, St. Joseph, De Kalb, Howard, Montgomery, Stark, Decatur, Huntington, Morgan, Steuben, Delaware, Jasper, Newton, Tippecanoe, Henry and Whitley. For Zone 5, a ceiling R-value of 49 is recommended, whereas the floor R-value should be at least 30.

For Zone 4 includes Orange, Perry, Brown, Clark, Crawford, Daviess, Dearborn, Dubois, Floyd, Gibson, Greene, Harrison, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, Knox, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Ohio, Pike, Posey, Ripley, Scott, Spencer, Sullivan, Switzerland, Vanderburgh, Warrick and Washington, and a ceiling R-value of 49 is recommended, whereas the floor R-value should be at least 19.

Some counties might experience harsher seasonal variations and therefore require higher R-value insulation. The R-value will also depend on whether or not there is already insulation installed in your attic prior to the procedure. Typically, attics without any prior insulation are going to require higher R-values for better insulation.

Thus, square footage and R-values are important determinants of how much insulation you’re going to need for your attic. If you’re unsure about exactly how much insulation you’re going to need, there are R-value calculators online, or you can call a contractor for an accurate quote.

How much does attic insulation cost in Indiana?

Once you’ve figured out what insulation you need and how much needs to be installed, you’re on your way to contacting a contractor and starting the process. But before you do so, it’s important to understand the costs involved with attic insulation.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

Once you’ve figured out what insulation you need and how much needs to be installed, you’re on your way to contacting a contractor and starting the process. But before you do so, it’s important to understand the costs involved with attic insulation.

Generally speaking, attic insulation can cost anywhere from $1,100 to $1,500, or between $1.50 to $3.50 per foot, depending on the material you choose and how much space you need to cover. As we noted earlier, blown-in insulation is the cheapest option. However, contractors often charge around $70 an hour, and in some cases, you might need to hire an electrician to make sure you aren’t disrupting any junction boxes or cables when insulating the attic. Electricians charge up to $85 an hour.

For Indiana homes, the cost of insulating your attic doesn’t necessarily vary a whole lot, but it’s still important to research average costs depending on where you live. Every house is going to be different, and every city or county is going to have different code regulations. Make sure you check your local building codes for not only R-values but also vapor barrier requirements.

For example, homeowners in Indianapolis, Indiana paid on average $1,513 for attic insulation. Compare that to another city in Indiana, say Gary, the average cost is about $1,669.  And also Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Indiana.

Manta’s database estimates attic insulation costs based on each city in Indiana, making it a reliable tool for determining your budget. Even Manta, however, recognizes that their estimates do not include things like permit costs, inspection fees, and labor fees, as that often varies depending on location and contractor rates.

Before contacting a professional to start applying insulation, ask yourself these questions about attic-dependent work outside of insulation:

  • Is everything in your attic air sealed? Do you need to fix your ductwork to prevent moisture buildup?
  • Does your attic have good ventilation? Does everything that’s ventilating into the attic have a way out of it?
  • Is there any mold in your attic? Have you contracted someone to come remove said mold?

If you have all of these bases covered, your attic insulation budget will be far more accurate. Contractors will also have an easier time getting your attic checked and insulated if you’ve taken care of the listed components.

Incentives, tax credits, rebates, and savings programs

Here are programs that are available to Indiana homeowners looking to add insulation:

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates

Vectren Energy Delivery offers its residential natural gas customers in Indiana rebates for the installation of certain high efficiency natural gas appliances and insulation measures. Rebates are available for furnaces, boilers, programmable thermostats, wall insulation, and ceiling insulation. In order to be eligible for a rebate, equipment must meet certain efficiency and installation requirements. Vectren reserves the right to verify sales receipts and perform post-installation verification inspections. Rebate forms must be postmarked within 60 days after installation.

Citizens Gas of Indiana offers rebates to its residential customers for the installation of several types of efficient natural gas appliances, improvements to attic and wall insulation, and duct sealing. 

Rebate applications, including a copy of all equipment invoices, must be postmarked within 60 days of equipment purchase. Citizens Gas reserves the right to verify sales and installation of eligible products and may conduct random site inspections for this purpose. Interested customers should see the program website or use the contact information below for more information.

How to hire an Indiana attic insulation contractor?

Once you’ve figured out your attic insulation cost, what types of insulation you need, and how much of it that’s needed, it’s most likely time to find the contractor who can handle the process.

Get an attic inspection

An insulation contractor will be able to properly inspect your attic and decide the necessary steps to take for updating your home’s insulation. You can consult with contractors about what type of insulation to use, R-values, and many of the other components we discussed earlier.

Get a free attic inspection and quote to insulate your attic.

But choosing the right contractor is going to make or break the process, and it can be difficult to choose between tens of dozens of professionals who claim that they’re the best in the business. We’ve identified a few things to keep in mind when hiring an attic insulation contractor.

Make sure they are thorough

First and foremost, pick someone who is thorough and transparent about your attic. If your contractor comes by your house for an inspection, and they perform various diagnostic tests and look through every corner of your attic, that’s an indication of their experience and reliability. Beware of contractors who take a quick peek in your attic and simply suggest putting in a few inches of insulation. A good contractor should initiate conversations about your attic’s insulation and ventilation issues and provide detailed steps on how to move forward. 

Check online reviews

But don’t base your decision on just a single interaction with the contractor. Go online and look through their services and offers. If they provide things like lifetime warranties, that means a contractor is not only confident in their work, but they’re also willing to follow up on their services to make sure you’re getting your money’s worth. Check their online reviews as well to see what others are saying about a contractor. If reviews are generally positive, that’s a sign of a reliable contractor. 

Attic insulation is anything but simple, but Indiana homeowners will greatly benefit from doing the proper research and spending their money on the right services and products. A properly insulated attic translates into a much more comfortable and energy-efficient home.