If you’re looking to ensure that your attic stays well ventilated, a solar attic fan is an excellent solution. Not only do they adequately remove hot air from the attic space and allow it to fill up with cool air, but they also run without the use of electricity, saving you money on your utility bill. It’s an efficient, effective, and environmentally friendly option.

Get a FREE solar powered attic fan quote (installation costs included).

It’s clear to see why a solar attic fan would be a good investment. But before you can upgrade your attic’s ventilation system, you need to decide which solar attic fan is the one for you. No two solar attic fans are the same, and your choice will need to consider the layout of your home amongst other considerations.

Our best solar attic fans reviews will help you figure out which will be best for you. We’ll discuss what makes each one unique and the factors to consider when choosing a solar attic fan

Attics and More is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Top 10 Best Solar Attic Fans Reviews

1. Remington

Best Solar Attic Fan - Remington

Product Details:

  • Roof-Mounted
  • Available at Different Power Levels
  • 20 to 40 Watts
  • 1,280 to 2,340 CFM
  • Lifetime Warranty

Remington Solar Attic Fans are some of the best solar attic fans for keeping your attic cool. These roof-mounted solar fans come equipped with a thermostat and humidistat for precise temperature regulation. Based on this data, it can increase or decrease the fan speed automatically.

Remington Fans also have an adapter to switch back and forth from solar to electric power easily. The censor is automatic, so your fan will switch back to running on solar power as soon as it detects sunlight.

Check out our detailed Remington Solar Attic Fan Review for more information.

2. Solaro

Best Solar Attic Fan - Solaro

Product Details:

  • Available in Multiple Types
  • 20 Watts
  • Brushless DC Motor
  • Polymer Blade
  • 24 inch Base
  • 900 CFM
  • 25-Year Warranty

The Solaro Aire is easily one of the best solar attic fans on the market today. With a reputation for superior quality and high efficiency, every Solaro Aire solar fan is USA-made using only the best materials.

The Solaro Aire is available in several types. You can get the roof-mounted Embedded model, with the solar panel embedded in the device itself, or the more traditional gable-mounted and portable versions. They even offer a Tilt model, which stands the solar panel up on an angle for maximum sun exposure.

Each of their fans comes with a 25-year warranty, so you can always feel secure with your Solaro purchase. If you’re interested, contact us for a quote for materials and installation. We are a licensed distributor of all Solaro products.

3. Yellowblue

Best Solar Attic Fan - Yellowblue

Product Details:

  • Available in Multiple Types
  • 20 Watts
  • Brushless DC Motor
  • 900 CFM
  • Limited Lifetime Warranty

Yellowblue Solar Fans are a strong competitor, about neck and neck with Solaro for the best solar attic fans. Designed by aerodynamic engineering experts and made from only the best materials, these solar fans are sure to improve the ventilation quality of any space.

Yellowblue fans are available in several types. They have the standard gable-mounted, roof-mounted, and portable models, of course. But there’s also a model designed for roofs in snowy areas with “S” tiles, as well as a model where the fan and solar panel come separately. Their tilted model sits atop a 360-degree rotating platform to optimize exposure to sunlight.

Plus, all Yellowblue fans come with a limited lifetime warranty. What better way to make you feel comfortable with your purchase? If you’re interested, contact us for a quote for materials and installation. We are a licensed distributor of all Yellowblue products.

4. US Sunlight

Best Solar Attic Fan - US Sunlight

Product Details:

  • Roof-Mounted
  • Galvanized Steel
  • 25 Watts
  • Ventilates up to 2,600 Cubic Feet

The US Sunlight solar fan is another decent option. This roof-mounted model features a tilted solar panel to maximize sun exposure. It can ventilate a large area, which is undoubtedly a plus.

However, there are some drawbacks. US Sunlight solar fans only work for shingled roofs, so if your roof is slate, flat, or tile, this one isn’t for you. It also doesn’t have the hybrid electric capabilities of some of its competitors. But if you have a shingled roof, it’s not bad for the price.

Check out our detailed US Sunlight Solar Attic Fan Review for more information.

5. Broan

Best Solar Attic Fan - Broan

Product Details:

  • Roof-Mounted
  • Plastic
  • 28 Watts
  • 537 CFM
  • 6-Year Warranty

The Broan-NuTone 345SOWW Surface Mount Attic Solar Fan is a good choice if you’re looking for something affordable. The basic materials keep the cost low, so you can get the ventilation system you need at the price you want.

Unfortunately, this model has a pretty low CFM compared to its competitors, so it won’t be as efficient. It also doesn’t come with a thermostat, humidistat, or any hybrid electric capabilities. For a small space, however, it should be an adequate solution in a pinch.

6. Air Vent

Product Details:

  • Roof or Gable-Mounted
  • 10 to 25 Watts
  • 800 to 1820 CFM
  • 20-Year Limited Warranty

Air Vent, Inc. also has some respectable solar attic fans available on their website. They have both roof-mounted and gable-mounted fans, and the roof-mounted ones have an option for the panel and the fan to come separately.

Depending on the size of your attic, you may decide whether the 10-Watt or the 25-Watt is appropriate for you. Either way, the product has a 20-year limited warranty, so you’re covered if anything goes wrong.

These solar fans can only work with shingled roofs and do not have hybrid electric capabilities.

7. Natural Light

Best Solar Attic Fan - Natural Light

Product Details:

  • Roof-Mounted
  • 32 Watts
  • 1560 CFM
  • 25-Year Warranty

Natural Light is another brand dedicated to providing customers with quality solar attic fans. The Natural Light Energy SAF32B Solar Attic Fan is a good option for a roof-mounted solar-powered fan with basic capabilities.

The tilted solar panel is for ideal sun exposure, and the apparatus runs very quietly. The CFM is nothing to scoff at either, as it could easily keep a 2200 square foot room cool.

The drawbacks of this model would be that it only fits on shingled roofs, and it doesn’t have an electric adapter.

8. Master Flow

Best Solar Attic Fan - Master Flow

Product Details:

  • Roof-Mounted
  • 15 Watts
  • 500 CFM
  • Galvanized Steel
  • 5-Year Limited Warranty

The Master Flow Solar Powered Roof Mount Attic Fan is one of the best solar attic fans for keeping a small attic space cool. It’s proven to improve attic ventilation and save energy.

However, at 15 Watts and 500 CFM, it’s a lot less powerful than most of the other fans on this list. This model would not be advisable for large attics. But with its tilted solar panel, proven efficiency, and 5-year warranty, it would serve a more modest attic well.

9. iLIVING

Best Solar Attic Fan - iLiving

Product Details:

  • Roof-Mounted
  • 20 Watts
  • 1750 CFM
  • Hybrid and Thermostat Options
  • 15-Year Warranty

iLIVING HYBRID Ready Smart Thermostat Solar Roof Attic Exhaust Fan is a great option to consider. This smart solar Attic fan is your best choice for cooling off your home if you need a thermostat.

Equipped with a powerful 20W adjustable polycrystalline solar panel, this fan is IP68 water proof. Built with a brushless motor, it provides up to 2000 sq. ft. of capacity cooling. The only big cons with this fan is that it can be a little noisy. There also are some reported issues with the shutters not closing properly.

10. Kennedy

Best Solar Attic Fan - Kennedy

Product Details:

  • Roof-Mounted
  • 16 to 65 Watts
  • 1,184 to 2,105 CFM
  • Lifetime Warranty

The Roof-Mounted Solar Attic Fan from Kennedy Skylights is another solar fan with plenty of customization options. The solar panel is available in 16, 32, 35, 48, or 65-Watt versions, so you can find the perfect one to suit your needs.

This solar fan is compatible with various roof types, and it even has an aluminum screen to keep rodents from damaging the device. If you want, you can add on features like a thermal snap switch or remote solar panel. Plus, Kennedy Skylights protects your purchase with a lifetime warranty.

These customization options and the generous warranty make this one of the best solar attic fans around.

Buyer’s Guide: Choosing the Best Solar Attic Fans

Now that you’ve seen how the top 10 best solar attic fans compare, it’s time to consider which one is the right match for your home. The layout and construction of your home will determine what kind of solar attic fan would be ideal. In this section, we’ll discuss the three different kinds of solar attic fans.

Gable-Mounted

If your house has a gable vent, a gable-mounted solar attic fan could be the right choice for you. It allows for easy installation. You just have to attach the unit to your gable and plug it in! It is much more convenient than installing a roof-mounted solar attic fan.

Unfortunately, because of the placement, gable-mounted designs are not as efficient as roof-mounted fans, so there is a trade-off. It’s crucial to get the placement just right to maximize the unit’s exposure to the sun. The gable mounting makes this a bit tricky, but it’s by no means impossible.

If your home is suited to it, a gable-mounted solar attic fan might be just what you need to improve your attic’s ventilation.

Roof-Mounted

Roof-mounted solar attic fans are efficient and powerful, but they also require a much more complex installation process. For it to work correctly, you’ll need to create a vent hole in the roof, install the fan, and seal the opening. This procedure can take quite a bit of time.

Due to the complexity, most roof-mounted fan users hire a professional for the installation. It makes the costs associated with a roof-mounted solar attic fan a bit more expensive than the other varieties, but the fan makes up for this with its efficiency.

Despite the hassle, roof-mounted models are among the best solar attic fans, as they tend to work much better than other varieties.

Roof-mounted solar attic fans get the most exposure to sunlight, making them the most efficient models. The long-term savings associated with this may also offset the upfront installation cost.

Portable

Portable solar fans are an excellent option for those looking for versatility. The fan and the solar panel come as two separate pieces connected with wires. They don’t require any strenuous installation process to set up, and you can put them almost anywhere!

While these work great for ventilating attics, this versatility and ease of installation make them perfect for smaller spaces like sheds and RVs. You can also take them with you on the go to keep you cool when camping.

These features are great, but the caveat is that portable solar fans aren’t as powerful as their gable-mounted or roof-mounted counterparts. They still work well, but they compromise ventilation quality for versatility.

Other Factors to Consider

Besides the fan type, you’ll also want to consider other factors that affect the performance of the solar attic fan.

Make sure that the fan you purchase is powerful enough to ventilate your attic. To do this, check out the fan’s venting capacity and compare it with the size of the space. The venting capacity is the cubic feet per minute (or CFM) of air moved by the fan. The fan’s CFM will need to be 70% or more of your attic’s size in cubic feet.

You’ll also want to make sure the fan has a high wattage, as this indicates that it can produce more electricity. If your desired solar fan doesn’t have a high enough venting capacity or wattage, you might need multiple fans to ventilate your attic.

Also, if you’re particularly interested in any special features, such as a humidistat or thermostat, make sure that these come with the model you are purchasing before you buy it.

What Are the Best Solar Attic Fans?

Although there are plenty of good options to choose from, the Solaro Aire and the Yellowblue Solar Fan are two of the best solar attic fans. Both are USA-made, and Solaro products come with a 25-year warranty, while Yellowblue fans come with a limited lifetime warranty. You really can’t go wrong with either one.

Ready to improve your attic’s ventilation by installing one of these brilliant fans? Get a free attic inspection and solar attic fan quote.

Some states have a year-long summer. Others are cold for 12 months.

In New Jersey and the Delaware Valley, homeowners experience all four seasons. Under these circumstances, there are specific actions homeowners can take to get the most out of their home.

One of these actions is improving the attic — specifically, the attic’s energy efficiency.

Keeping the attic energy efficient helps keep the home healthy during all four seasons.

Here are 4 of the best ways to improve your attic energy efficiency.

1. Improve Your Attic’s Access Point

The attic access point — you probably see it every day without thinking twice about it.

Your scuttle hole and/or attic door could be wasting your home’s energy.

If the attic access point is not optimized for energy efficiency, air will be leaking between your living area and your attic. Your conditioned air can escape through the attic access point, wasting energy and money on conditioning the lower levels of your home. It doesn’t matter what season it is either — whether you are trying to keep your home toasty in the winter of cool in the summer, your attic access point can contribute to energy loss.

The solution?

We recommend two things:

  1. Weatherstripping
  2. Attic access cover

Attic accesses often have gaps between the door and the ceiling/attic floor. When these gaps are present, weatherstripping is a simple do-it-yourself solution.

For homeowners looking to get the most out of their time and effort, installing an attic access cover could be the perfect remedy.

Attic access covers are a simple installation made for attic scuttle holes and latches. They insulate the attic access and prevent the air from escaping in the same way that weatherstripping does. Other benefits of attic access insulation covers include:

  • Prevents bugs from entering the living area
  • Saves money on monthly energy bills
  • The material is durable and built to last

Weatherstripping and attic access covers are both excellent options. However, for the strongest means of insulation and energy saving, attic access covers provide the best results.

2. Improve Your Attic’s Sealing

After you tackle your attic access, the next step to improving attic energy efficiency is to improve the attic itself.

The first part of that is sealing.

The main goal of improving sealing is to prevent air leakage from the attic.

As mentioned in part 1, air can leak out of gaps and cracks in the attic access. However, the concept of air leakage can be a problem elsewhere.

Polyurethane foam seals gaps in wooden frame construction conserving energy.

Air can leak in gaps in windows, walls, and the floor especially. Take a look around and examine if you have gaps around the following:

  • Wire holes
  • Can lights
  • Ducts or vents
  • Cracks in the floorboards
  • Spaces where walls/floors/ceilings meet

If you find spaces near these elements, materials such as sealant, caulk, and/or weatherstrips can often be good solutions. All three will help limit the amount of air leakage in the attic.

For those with duct-work in their attic, air sealing can be critical.

When your air is leaking from ducts, all of the air that would be funneled directly into your living room may not be leaking up from your attic access, but directly from the ducts themselves. Thanks to something know as the “stack effect” (rising heat in the house), air leakages from ducts happen constantly, even when your air is not running. The joints that hold the ducts together leak air, the space in between the ducts and walls leak air, and you end up paying for it (literally — in utility bills).

When it comes to sealing duct-work, a materials such as spray foam, duct mastic, or duct tape can be a homeowners best friend.

Homeowners should also consider the importance of insulating the ducts as well. This concept should actually be applied to the entirety of the attic.

3. Improve Your Attic Insulation

Thanks to infrared technology, we are able to further see where homes need insulation.

When our technicians go into homes, the attic is one of the usual suspects for under-insulation.

In the Delaware Valley, where recommended R-Value (resistance to heat) ranges from R38 to R60, having the right amount of insulation is a necessity if you want good whole-home health. R-Values vary by material, but to get a better sense of what kind of R-Values you may already have, check out this chart. For the most accurate measurements, it’s always best to have a healthy home professional inspect your attic and determine what R-Value will work best for your home.

So how do you insulate your attic?

First, consider R-Value.

Next, identify what kind of insulation and what amount of insulation you will need for optimal insulation.

Some of the most popular attic insulation materials include:

  • Fiberglass (comes as batt)
  • Cellulose (comes blown)
  • Mineral wool (comes batt or blown)

Your walls, joists, and attic floors may all need better insulation. You may be able to judge this with the naked eye, but we recommend having an expert take a look. Experienced technicians will be able to give you more insight into R-Values, identify every spot that needs insulation, and offer actionable advice on the best way to handle any under-insulation.

Bonus Tip: Use Multi-Layer Reflective Insulation.

Multi-Layer Reflective Insulation (MLI) is the hidden gem of insulation materials.

MLI reflects radiant heat from the sun that permeates through the roof to keep R-Value consistent, and the temperature in the living area contained.

While most MLI installations take place in the attic, we can apply our reflective insulation products anywhere in your home to better insulate your home. Attics, crawl spaces, garage doors, below your floors—we even have wraps for old hot water heaters. MLI can help you improve your home’s energy efficiency levels and enjoy increased savings and comfort.

4. Improve Your Attic Ventilation

Ventilation, often thought of as “airflow”, tends to be overlooked.

Unlike other parts of the country like the southern and western states where it is hot year-round and attics can reach deathly high temperatures, the northeast only experiences high-heat for about two months. Likewise, the importance of airflow in the attic can easily escape the minds of homeowners.

Plus, most people aren’t really hanging out in their attic. So why does your attic need ventilation?

The truth is, ventilation is needed during every month of the year.

If you don’t have a healthy stream of air in your attic in the summer, you could be looking at moisture damage and mold.

And if you don’t have that healthy airflow in the winter, you could be looking at different yet similar issues. The potential for mold growth will be there, and excess moisture could cause warped joists, unsafe ice damming on the roof, and rotting wood.

The solution?

We recommend using a solar attic fan in New Jersey.

Solar attic fans — as the name implies — run solely on the power of the sun. That means less electricity is needed and more energy efficiency is earned.

They regulate your attic by expelling hot air and circulating fresh outside air to maintain healthy, consistent air quality.

To learn more about the benefits of installing a solar attic fan, click here.

Take Action — Improve Your Attic

If you want to improve your attic, we recommend seeking out the advice of an expert. Our technicians offer free attic inspections and can give you personalized advice based on the condition of your house and the climates that your house will be going through. To get an expert’s perspective, contact us today for a free inspection.

Every summer homeowners face the same dilemma of trying to keep their homes cool without breaking the bank on their energy bills, with the average energy bill totaling about $137 a month.

What many homeowners don’t know is that their attics can be a big culprit to wasting energy.

Cool your attic with a solar powered attic fan.

Heat often collects in the attic from the roof and radiates into the lower living spaces. This forces homeowners to crank up the AC, raising energy bills. So what can you do?

Luckily, there are several ways homeowners can cool their attics and make their homes more energy-efficient. Through air sealing, insulation, or ventilation, you can finally cool your attic the right way.

Air Sealing

One of the easiest and best ways to help cool down a hot attic is with proper air sealing. This is particularly effective when used in tandem with insulation and other strategies.

What is Air Sealing?

Air sealing is the process of finding and closing air leakage points in and around your home. In your attic, this is usually your walls, floors, entrances, and spots in between ventilation units. These pockets of air leakage can be big or small, accounting for over 40% of all energy lost in your home.

For more information on attic air sealing, including cost savings, check out our guide: Is Air Sealing the Attic Worth It?

How Air Sealing Cools Your Attic

How Air Sealing Cools Your Attic

By properly air sealing your attic, you’ll prevent cool air generated by your AC units from escaping to your attic. It’ll also prevent heat and warm air in the attic from radiating down into the lower levels.

It also prevents the formation of ice dams on your roofs in the winter. This is relevant in the summer because ice dams can cause moisture buildup which damages your attic insulation. If your insulation is weak or insufficient, your attic will allow more heat to transfer into your home in the hot summer months.

How to Air Seal Your Attic

Before You Start

If you can, obtain or create a sketch of your attic. This will help you pinpoint areas of air leakage. Pay close attention to areas like dropped soffits over kitchen cabinets, slanted ceilings over stairways, areas where the walls and ceilings meet, and other dropped-ceiling areas.

See where your attic is leaking air. Schedule a free attic inspection.

Wiring holes, gaps near plumbing and pipes, and recessed lights are also common areas for attic air leakage. Write these spots down and make sure you have the right equipment to seal them.

Alternatively, we recommend getting a professional attic inspection complete by a licensed contractor. This will provide you with detailed insights, including thermal images of your attic. Use an attic inspector’s experience and professional equipment to pinpoint the exact spots where unwanted heat transfer is taking place.

Air Sealing the Attic

Start by filling in the big holes. You can do this by wrapping insulation in plastic bags and plugging areas like open stud cavities, making sure it fits tightly.

For dropped soffits, remove the insulation and add a piece of reflective foil or rigid foam board that’s a few inches longer than the opening. Seal it in place using caulk or other adhesives.

For pipes that have small air pockets, use caulk or foam to fill the space around them. Make sure you seal the attic hatch as well with new wood stops and adhesive foam weather strips.

Attic Insulation

Attic Insulation

Insulation is usually the most common method of cooling down your attic and preventing the heat from transferring downstairs. It both prevents heat from radiating downwards while simultaneously keeping cool air from escaping to the attic.

What is Attic Insulation?

Attic insulation creates barriers between the roof and your attic, as well as the attic floor to the rest of the home. It comes in a variety of materials, including fiberglass, cellulose, and even reflective surfaces similar to foil.

How Insulation Cools Your Attic

Insulation keeps the sun’s heat from radiating into the lower floors, meaning your home will be noticeably cooler. This means your AC won’t have to work quite as hard to maintain a cool internal temperature.

Insulation also prevents cool air from downstairs from escaping into the stuffy attic since it reduces the movement of air. Overall, the EPA estimates that you can save over 15% on your annual energy bills just by adding insulation to your attics and other areas.

How to Apply Attic Insulation

Before You Start

Always check your local building code recommended R-values, or your insulation’s ability to reduce conductive heat flow. It’s also recommended that you seal any air holes prior to installing insulation.

Take note of areas in your attic with plumbing, ductwork, and wiring. For your own safety, make sure there aren’t any cracks in your attic’s foundation.

If you’re applying rolled-up batts or reflective insulation, make all the necessary measurements so your insulation fits properly. Purchase safety goggles and masks, since materials like fiberglass can be dangerous to your lungs and eyes.

Insulating an Attic

If you’re using batt or roll insulation, target areas like your skylights and cut out the necessary amount of insulation. You can secure it between the framings with staples and house wrap.

Get an attic insulation estimate. Schedule a free attic inspection.

Make sure not to compress the insulation, or else it’ll become less effective. Whether it’s the stud walls or the joists, make sure you gently fit the insulation without leaving any gaps.

If you’re using blown-in insulation, plug in the machine and feed half a bag of insulation into it. Turn the machine on and fill any areas that need insulation. Be careful not to spray the loose fill in the rafter vents.

Reflective insulation requires you to measure out the surface area of the places you’re covering and stapling the material to the wood.

Attic Ventilation

Ventilation allows your home to breathe. In the attic, it pulls fresh air through it and lets the heat escape on a regular basis. Let’s explore how attic ventilation works to cool down your home.

What is Attic Ventilation?

A balanced ventilation system occurs when the amount of air coming into the attic equals the amount leaving it. The cooler air from the intake vents pushes the warm air up and out through the exhaust vents near the ridge.

Without proper intake ventilation, the exhaust vents don’t work and the heat doesn’t have a way to escape. This can cause permanent damage to your roof, which as we discussed, can damage your attic insulation and affect your home temperature.

How Attic Ventilation Cools Your Home

How Attic Ventilation Cools Your Home

In the summer, an improperly vented attic can generate a lot of heat through hot outside air having nowhere to go. This means your upstairs rooms will be uncomfortably hot until the sun goes down.

As such, poor ventilation causes hotter attics. This means hotter upstairs rooms and more stress on your AC units. By installing proper ventilation and letting the air circulate in and out of your attic, less heat will be trapped in the attic.

How to Ventilate Your Attic

Before You Start

First, look for signs of poor ventilation by either looking at your home yourself or calling a contractor. These signs include:

  • Curling shingles
  • Roof damage
  • Excessive attic heat
  • High summer energy bills
  • Rust on metal components in the attic

Keep in mind that every attic has different ventilation needs. Calculate the right amount of ventilation for your attic beforehand. There are a few different equations you can use to determine this number.

Ventilating an Attic

Generally speaking, installing attic ventilation isn’t a DIY project. You should call a trusted professional to install the different types of attic ventilation common in most homes.

Cool your attic with a solar powered attic fan.

There are several different types of attic ventilation that you can use to improve the air circulation in your attic. These include turbine vents that can remove over 300 cubic feet of air a minute.

Active, power vents are smaller vents that can pull hot air out of the attic using electricity or solar power. Passive vents, such as box vents or ridge vents, can use natural winds and convection to move air through your attic.

Best Solar Attic Fans

Best Solar Attic Fans

Check out our list of the best solar powered attic fans.

Lower Your Energy Bills With Cooler Attics

Your attic is a literal hotspot for summer heat, but that doesn’t mean you have to break the bank trying to pay your energy bills. Leverage the three different strategies in this article to create a much more energy-efficient attic today.

Recently I met a man who used to work in the construction business. More specifically, he worked in a niche as a construction “fixer.” His job was to go to newer developments where homeowners had various complaints or problems with their houses, narrow down the issues, itemize them, quote the price to fix the problems, and assist the homeowners by trying to work out solutions with the original developer who built the homes. His story applies to all homes, but I found it ironic that he was experiencing this in newer homes.

While out on a call to a home in winter, he entered the homeowner’s master bedroom. He saw black streaks on the ceiling. He pointed them out to the homeowner and asked if they could take a look in the attic. The homeowner seemed surprised by this and asked him why. My friend said, “Do you know what those streaks of black are on the ceiling?” The homeowner was puzzled and had no idea. My friend said, “That’s mold growing on your ceiling, and I guarantee you that your attic is wet.”

They went up to the attic, icicles were hanging from the attic ceiling, and, sure enough, the attic was also wet. The culprit? There was no ventilation in the attic. It might be hard to believe that icicles can form inside the house, but in many older homes that lack proper insulation and ventilation, the attic can become a magnet for condensation, which will freeze when it gets cold enough and the moisture has nowhere to go. … After a while, this frost builds up to form icicles. Homeowners assume that attic fans are only useful in the summer to move the heat around and keep the attic and home cooler. This could not be further from the truth. While fan ventilation does the trick in summer with the correct type of fan and the fan’s correct placement, it is just as important in winter. In the winter, heat in your home rises – to the attic. With it comes moisture. When attics are not well ventilated, moisture collects in this area of the home. … Adequate attic ventilation allows cool, dry air from outside to come into the attic, while warm, moist air inside the attic can escape.

Attics and More sells solar attic fans that have a lifetime guarantee. They install quickly and are workhorses without tapping into your electrical grid. Some other facts about our fans:

  • They can withstand 150 mph hurricane winds
  • They can withstand golf ball-sized hail
  • We offer a lifetime warranty
  • The flanges are made of a single piece of aircraft quality aluminum
  • They are made in the USA
  • The motor is completely sealed, which means that no dust or moisture can get inside causing the motor to seize and potentially creating a fire hazard
  • They are whisper quiet

Our price not only includes the installation of the new solar fan but the removal of another fan if you have an existing one. Our solar fans also qualify for the federal solar tax credit (26% for year ending 12/31/2020), and we provide the paperwork to you. This credit steadily declines each subsequent year, so it really is in your best interest to purchase a fan now. Our fans are not made in China like those sold in the big box stores, and ours come with a lifetime warranty that cannot be matched.

If you have not had the opportunity to see or have one installed over the hot summer months, now is the time to contact us for a complimentary appointment to see our fans at your home up close and personal, AND take advantage of the highest federal solar tax credit. Let our Attic Specialist stop by to recommend the fan that would best suit your attic based on square footage and roof pitch, so give us a call today at 856-474-2400!

If you did not have the opportunity to see or purchase one of our amazing solar powered attic fans over the summer, now is not the time to exclude these marvels from your budget. They are effective in both summer and winter. Your attic needs to breathe. In the summer, the fans move the air from sun-up to sundown off the grid keeping the air moving and the temperature down, and in the winter, the fans circulate the accumulation of moisture that builds up in an attic from the kitchen and bathroom, preventing mold growth and other expensive issues.

We are getting close to the end of the tax year. The Federal Solar Tax Energy Credit now sits at 26%. For each subsequent year, that percentage drops.  While you are planning your budget for the end of 2020, you may want to invest in a reasonably priced, high quality product that allows you to reap benefits from both a cost and comfort perspective. Your home is your greatest asset. Why not show it some well-deserved love too?

Give us a call at 856-474-2400 or visit our web page where you can fill out a simple form requesting a free inspection of your attic. We can send one of our highly qualified Attic Specialists to your home with a fan in hand. You can take a look, ask questions, and our inspector will determine what type of attic fan will do the trick.  There is never any obligation and we love meeting our neighbors who live in the communities we all share.